Follow-Up Friday, plus David Hogg defeats Publix

First, I want to thank you for all your reading. This is my 99th blog and so far there have been more than 14,100 page views. Dozens of you are reading and clicking more than once, even when I don’t post anything, and the numbers have really been going up.

feature hogg fb

Reading above what’s above would good thing to do over the long weekend. For those of you who haven’t been, I recently achieved the trifecta of categories: golden showers, pass gas (fart), and semen (cum) – all for news reasons, of course, and each used only once – so maybe you’ll start by subscribing.

weinstein

You never know what’ll come up next!

Here is a hint. It’s called Follow-Up Friday, and it’s good to see Harvey Weinstein in deep (pick a bodily substance from above).

The New York Times wrote Weinstein facing

“charges that he had raped one woman and forced another to perform oral sex … stood not only as a breakthrough in the investigation into sex-crime claims against him but as a watershed in the larger #MeToo movement.”

According to The Times via Slate Magazine,

Weinstein arrived at the precinct at 7:30am, got fingerprinted, then departed in handcuffs—without his books—about an hour later. From there he was driven to the courthouse, where he was arraigned at 9:25am and made bail on a cashier’s check for $1 million.”

Yes, you read “books” and Slate reported,

“Footage of his arrival shows Weinstein entering the precinct with three books in his arms—one about Elia Kazan, another about Rodgers and Hammerstein, and a third, floppy, leather-bound volume that hasn’t been identified.”

Then upon further review, Slate suspected the “books were almost certainly props” since,

“The choice of titles might also be designed to send some kind of message: Elia Kazan was a brilliant but disgraced film director and a ‘calculating, unfaithful womanizer’; composer Richard Rodgers was known to be sexually aggressive with the women who performed his musicals.”

Whether criminal suspects in New York get to read books they bring is under debate but Slate noted,

“Under normal circumstances, a person who surrenders to police can expect to wait 12 to 24 hours before heading off to see a judge. This includes time spent waiting to be transported to the courthouse, as officers don’t tend to make this trip until they have a group of people ready for arraignment. The fact that Weinstein got the ‘walkthrough’ treatment—coming in and out in just two hours—suggests that all arrangements (including the amount of his bail) had been worked out ahead of time by his lawyer and the district attorney’s office.”

That shouldn’t happen.

Neither should this: another school shooting. Today’s happened at an Indiana middle school. At least nobody was killed. CNN reports three people were injured — a teacher and a student, according to Noblesville’s police chief — “but hospital officials said at least three people, including one adult, were being treated. One student had an ankle fracture.”

A student was arrested a short time later, in or near his classroom. The chief said he’d asked for permission to leave the room and “he returned armed with two handguns.”

What did Indiana’s former governor have to say?

CNN noted “The shooting comes a week after 10 people were killed at a school in Santa Fe, Texas,” and “There have been 23 school shootings where someone was hurt or killed so far this year – an average of more than one shooting a week.”

I guess many more people than the usual students and teachers can’t wait for this school year to finally end.feature santa fe

I don’t know of any other Noblesville so there was no confusion like Santa Fe, when I showed you Philadelphia’s WTXF-Fox 29 (my former employer) did nothing but take a story from their sister-station in Houston, which didn’t have to specify a state.

wtnh santa fe ftvlive
http://www.ftvlive.com/sqsp-test/2018/5/20/nope

Unfortunately for folks in Connecticut, FTVLive’s Scott Jones found out about this from WTNH-Channel 8 (my former competition).

Maybe Fox 29 will finally learn to take its journalism and attention to detail more seriously, like its three main competitors, so it doesn’t mislead its viewers or readers. Heck, even Connecticut journalists were confused!

It didn’t take long, but Parkland shooting survivor David Hogg is back in the news for a victory against one of the biggest supermarkets in the southeast – Publix – and Florida GOP primary gubernatorial candidate Adam Putnam, for that matter.

2018-02-17 David Hogg Wikipedia
Wikipedia

Putnam made news for not getting any invitations to appear on Fox News, while his opponent, Congressman Ron DeSantis, has been on about a hundred times so far this year.

ron desantis adam putnam
Ron DeSantis, Adam Putnam

 

 

 

 

 

Besides the fair and balanced folks at Fox, Putnam has one friend and one enemy. The friend is Publix (not because it’s prude) and the enemy is Hogg, and today, Publix announced it’s suspending all corporate campaign contributions immediately.

The Tampa Bay Times reported Publix had given $670,000 to Putnam campaigns over the last three years. Its headline, ten days ago, was “Publix is supporting Adam Putnam’s run for governor like no politician before.”

On top of that,

“No other Florida candidate has ever come close to that kind of subsidy from Florida’s largest Fortune 500 company. Its most recent contribution, a $100,000 donation on April 30, was the largest, too, according to the latest campaign finance filings.”

Also,

“In 2016, WFTS-Channel 28 discovered seven Tampa Bay-area Publix stores failed health inspections. In those stores, food inspectors found rodent droppings, hundreds of pounds of meat and other food stored at unsafe temperatures, bugs and employees not washing their hands, according to the report. Putnam responded the next day by pulling the inspections from the department’s website and eliminating the pass/fail grading system.”

Publix logo exteriorPublix is based in Lakeland, and Putnam lives in Bartow, both in Polk County.

Thanks to Hogg, Publix faced “consumer boycotts, student protests and threats to its wholesome image.” Now, it’s acknowledging the “divide” it caused by its unprecedented financial support of Putnam’s campaign.

According to the Washington Times,

“The public face of the gun control movement demanded $1 million Thursday from the Florida-based grocery chain in a tweet, just one day after calling for a “die-in” protest at its stores.”

He also wanted an acknowledgment for the gun control movement.

As for Putnam, he’s sticking with the National Rifle Association and against the wishes of the survivors, some of whom like Hogg, will be old enough to vote against him. The primary is set for Aug. 28.

issue ads
See my May 8 post.

Facebook is acting on something I brought you earlier this month: “protecting legitimate political discussion within our community and fighting foreign interference in elections.”

Hit the question mark for help and type in “political ads.”

The social media giant will tell you,

“When ads with political content appear on Facebook, they’re required to include information about who paid for them. An ad with political content on Facebook can be identified by the label: Sponsored – Paid for by. This label is followed by information about who paid for the ad. Learn more about what’s considered an ad with political content.”

Then, after a way to report seeing “an ad on Facebook that has political content, but doesn’t have a label showing who paid for it,” it tells you “Ads that have political content and have appeared on Facebook on or after May 7, 2018 will also appear in the Archive of Ads With Political Content.”

facebook political issue ads
https://newsroom.fb.com/news/2018/05/ads-with-political-content/

That’s not just candidates, but issue ads from outside parties, too. The details were revealed when the expanded requirements took effect – yesterday.

Also, Adweek reported, “Twitter revealed a similar tactic Wednesday, saying that it was teaming up with nonprofit civic organization Ballotpedia to create election labels for the accounts of candidates running in the 2018 U.S. midterm elections.”

Something else you won’t be seeing on Facebook anymore are videos from The Weather Channel.

“[Facebook video] hasn’t been beneficial,” said Neil Katz, global head of content and engagement at The Weather Channel, according to Digiday at its Video Summit. “It has been good for Facebook, but it hasn’t been good for us.”

The publication wrote, “The Weather Channel’s Facebook presence included its main page as well as ‘weather-adjacent’ science, nature and travel verticals such as Rockets Are Cool, Crazimals and United States of Awesome.”

In March, The Weather Channel was sold to entrepreneur and entertainment executive Byron Allen, who us older folk remember from Real People. Another wise decision, sir.

Others are not as wise. Watch this news report FTVLive’s Scott Jones found from an excellent reporter, Stanley Roberts, at KRON in San Francisco. His beat is People Behaving Badly. This is for those of you who want to be in public but not on TV.

I love when people who don’t know what they’re talking about keep talking and talking, digging themselves further and further into a hole. By the way, a person has the right to shoot and record video in a public place. As far as consent for voice, which varies by state, a guy holding a video camera close by kind of tells you that you may be recorded! Sort of like a beep when you hear someone’s voicemail. Just a clue for the clueless.

And this is something I’ve seen several times before: Philadelphia’s own Frank Rizzo – former police commissioner who served two terms as mayor for most of the 1970s. He’d been out of office for less than a year when approached by a KYW-TV3 investigative reporter. This is something you shouldn’t miss, nor should the people above.

And speaking of Americans and our rights, the Philadelphia region’s two largest grocery store chains aren’t looking too super when it comes to our holidays, at least to me.

I hope Acme and ShopRite don’t know the meaning of Memorial Day, in which we honor our fallen heroes who are no longer able to barbecue or go down to the Jersey Shore. Otherwise, it’s just damn rude and insensitive.

acme memorial day
Acme wants you to celebrate Memorial Day
shoprite memorial day
ShopRite says to have a happy Memorial Day

Their recommendations to party should’ve been reminders to remember.

On that note, please don’t forget to read, show your friends and subscribe if you haven’t.

And have a good, long holiday weekend. (Wouldn’t that have been enough?)

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The Weather Channel’s new owner, a real controversial person

There are two big changes in weather: The snow has stopped and The Weather Channel is being sold.weather channel logo

Also, you can say the owner is a real person for two more reasons: The new owner is not a partnership between three corporations, like in the past – and he was one of the stars of the TV show Real People!

Deadline magazine reports Byron Allen bought the Weather Group, parent company of The Weather Channel TV network, for about $300 million. His wholly-owned Entertainment Studios paid a lot less than the $3.5 billion the owners spent for the company in 2008. IBM bought The Weather Company’s digital Product and Technology Businesses – WSI, Weather.com, Weather Underground and The Weather Company brand – in 2015.

Entertainment Studios logo

The Weather Channel and Local Now streaming service had been owned by The Blackstone Group, Bain Capital and Comcast/NBCUniversal. Deadline pointed out those groups “experimented with longer-form programming and big-name talent” such as Al Roker and Sam Champion.

It also said Allen, “comedian-turned-entrepreneur, has been growing his Entertainment Studios, which became the largest independent producer of first-run syndicated programming.”

byron allen
http://www.es.tv/trending-funny/

Allen has also been busy in court. In April 2017, a federal judge denied Charter Communications’ Motion to Dismiss his $10 billion lawsuit for racial discrimination in contracting.

Allen said at the time,

“This lawsuit was filed to provide distribution and real economic inclusion for 100% African American-owned media. The cable industry spends $70 billion a year licensing cable networks and 100% African American-owned media receives ZERO. This is completely unacceptable. We will not stop until we achieve real economic inclusion for 100% African American-owned media.”

Allen had also sued Comcast, Time Warner Cable and Rev. Al Sharpton for $20 billion, claiming “black media companies receive a small share of the annual spending on cable licensing.”

He claimed,

“The industry spends about $50 billion a year licensing cable networks in which 100 percent African American-owned media receives less than $3 million per year in revenue from that $50 billion stream of money that is spent to acquire content.”

comcast new 595x227

Allen also accused media companies of adding insult to injury by throwing money at Sharpton, employed by Comcast-owned MSNBC – saying they used “the least expensive negro” to “cover” up their track record of “blatant” discrimination.

On top of that, Allen called President Obama “bought and paid for” by Comcast.

“What happened in the Obama administration is former (FCC) commissioner Meredith Attwell Baker voted for the merger of Comcast NBCU and then 90 days later took a much higher paying job with Comcast after granting them the merger,” Allen said. “That was betraying the public’s trust as a public service.”

As of April 2017, that suit was pending. At least part of it had been dismissed, but Allen was appealing. I could not find anything on Entertainment Studios’ website while searching for Comcast, Warner, Time-Warner, or Sharpton.

Byron Allen: Black people are doing worse under President Obama.

Byron Allen standing by his controversial comments.

But he sued AT&T and forced the company’s subsidiary DirecTV to pick up seven Entertainment Studios Networks channels.

Real People cast
Did you watch NBC, Wednesdays 8-9pm, 1979-84? Top: John Barbour, Sarah Purcell, Skip Stephenson, Byron Allen; Bottom: Bill Rafferty

Looks like Allen has turned out to be the most successful of the Real People cast!

A look back at Real People:

Byron Allen heads to cheerleading school:

Byron Allen visits a bar on Venice Beach where disco on skates is king:

Byron Allen visits the experimental aircraft convention and talks to vets:

The syndicated Byron Allen Show, 1989-92.

We may have learned the fates of seven TV stations that will be divested if the $3.9 billion Sinclair-Tribune merger I’ve written against time and time again is allowed to happen.

Apparently, they won’t be going far – just to Armstrong Williams.

armstrong williams
http://www.armstrongwilliams.com/

Wikipedia calls him “an American political commentator, entrepreneur, author of a nationally syndicated conservative newspaper column, and host of a daily radio show and a nationally syndicated TV program called The Armstrong Williams Show.” The South Carolina native is also the largest African-American owner of television stations in the U.S.

I also can’t leave out the unbelievable: He served as “legislative aide and advisor to Sen. Strom Thurmond.” Yes, the same Strom Thurmond who The New York Times remembered ran

“for president in 1948 as what the press called a Dixiecrat.” …

“He said that ‘on the question of social intermingling of the races, our people draw the line.’ And, he went on, ‘all the laws of Washington and all the bayonets of the Army cannot force the Negro into our homes, into our schools, our churches and our places of recreation and amusement.’

“His opposition to integration, which he often attributed to Communism, was the hallmark of his career in Washington until the 1970’s. In 1971, he was among the first Southern senators to hire a black aide — in recognition of increased black voting resulting from the legislation he had fought. From then on, black South Carolinians, like all other residents, benefited from his skills as a pork-barrel politician who took care of the home folks.

“‘We’ve looked out for the state,’ he said in a 1999 interview, ‘and everything that was honorable to get, we got it.’”

strom thurmond
via U.S. Senate Historical Office

According to a Senate website, “He turned 100 years old in 2002, becoming the oldest person ever to serve as a senator. He also holds the Senate’s record for the longest individual speech, his filibuster against the 1957 Civil Rights Act.” He retired Jan. 3, 2003, and died that June.

According to The Times, “Mr. Thurmond always insisted he had never been a racist, but was merely opposed to excessive federal authority.”

So that was Armstrong Williams’ boss at one point. Wikipedia adds,

“He is principal in Howard Stirk Holdings, a media company affiliated with Sinclair Broadcasting that has made numerous television station purchases.”

The name of the company came from both William’s mother’s middle name, Howard, and his father’s middle name, Stirk.

On President Trump’s “s__thole countries” comment: “An indictment about what’s in his heart.”

African-American conservative and South Carolina native talks about removing the Confederate flag.

Sinclair has been known for using shell corporations like Cunningham Broadcasting to own stations while Sinclair actually operates them, including programming them and doing everything else true owners would do, as an attempt to get by the rules.

Williams has been in business with Sinclair – a corporation with overtly and pushy conservative leanings – before.

Armstrong Williams on President Obama’s “arrogant and dictatorial style.”

The backstory is that Williams helped Sinclair buy Barrington Broadcasting. He got NBC affiliate WEYI-TV in Flint-Saginaw-Bay City, Mich., and CW affiliate WWMB in Myrtle Beach-Florence, S.C., BUT according to Wikipedia,

“Both stations remain operated by Sinclair under a local marketing agreement, which resulted in allegations that the company was simply acting as a ‘sidecar’ of Sinclair to skirt FCC ownership rules. Williams defended the allegations, noting that he had full control over their programming, and received the majority of their revenue.”

He did buy five other stations, three from Sinclair.

Williams’ website has the headline “Howard Stirk Holdings seeks to acquire 7 local affiliates in early 2018!” (really in six cities) and a picture with logos, but no article. At least it says “seeks.”

new HOWARD STIRK

I found connections to the Sinclair-Tribune deal in all the stations pictured, with just a question about one.

Let’s take a look at the stations (clockwise on above graphic):

* Sinclair’s WLRH-35 in Richmond, Va. (Fox affiliate with CW on subchannel), since Tribune owns competitor WTVR-6 (CBS affiliate).

map Harrisburg Indy Greensboro

* North Carolina’s Triad (Greensboro, Winston-Salem, High Point) is where I have my big question. Sinclair owns WXLV-45 (ABC affiliate) and also WMYV-48 (MyNetworkTV affiliate). Tribune owns WGHP-8 (Fox affiliate). I would expect one of those three to go, but the logo on Armstrong Williams’ website is for WCWG-20 (CW affiliate). Just last month, Hearst bought that station from Lockwood Broadcast Group, but it had already been operating the station under a shared services agreement. Hearst also owns the market’s NBC affiliate, WXII-12, making a duopoly. How any other owner would fit in, since Hearst just finished the sale and got a duopoly last month, is a mystery to me – unless The CW plans to change its affiliated station in the market. Note the station already has a good owner that puts a newscast on it, but nothing – not even public service — compares to money when it comes to broadcasting. (Also keep in mind, a month ago, Sinclair made a case to the FCC it should be able to own more than one of the top four stations in Harrisburg, Indianapolis and Greensboro, N.C.)

kdnl people* Sinclair’s KDNL-30 in St. Louis. This weak ABC affiliate with lousy ratings canceled its local news in 2001. From 2011 to 2014, a competitor aired news for it at 5 and 10:00. Then came a year with Family Feud and Who Wants to Be a Millionaire instead of news. Since 2015, it has been airing The Allman Report, which says it has a “debate-driven format,” at 5 and 10pm, and 6:30am. But what about news? Click here for the station’s website’s People page. Notice it’s empty! Tribune owns two competitors in St. Louis: KTVI-2 (Fox affiliate) and KPLR-11 (CW affiliate). Sinclair filed to own two stations in this market. The St. Louis situation could come down to which stations are and are not part of the top four rated in the city, per FCC rules. Read below for details.

* Tribune’s KZJO-22 in Seattle (MyNetworkTV affiliate), since Tribune also owns KCPQ-13 (Fox affiliate that Fox itself really wants to buy), and Sinclair owns both KOMO-4 (ABC affiliate) and KUNS-TV51 (Univision affiliate) there.

* Sinclair’s KOKH-25 (Fox affiliate) and KOCB-34 (CW affiliate) in Oklahoma City. Tribune owns both KFOR-4 (NBC affiliate) and KAUT-43 (independent) there.

* Dreamcatcher Broadcasting’s WGNT-27 (CW affiliate) in Norfolk, Va., which is operated by Tribune, while Tribune also owns WTKR-3 (CBS affiliate) there. Sinclair owns WTVZ-33 (MyNetworkTV affiliate) in Norfolk.

sinclair before tribune
Sinclair currently, without Tribune, from http://sbgi.net/tv-stations/

No price has been announced, but it was reported a few weeks ago Sinclair will sell WPIX-New York for a measly $15 million to Cunningham Broadcasting, owned by Sinclair’s founder’s survivors, and WGN-TV Chicago for just $60 million to Steven B. Fader, chairman of Baltimore-based Atlantic Capital Group and business partner of Sinclair executive chairman David Smith in Atlantic Automotive Corp.

That’s peanuts. Pennies on the dollar. No stations above even come close to WPIX-New York or WGN-TV Chicago, each worth hundreds of millions of dollars, maybe a half-billion. But Sinclair will get to run them and possibly buy them back within eight years, if the rules are relaxed further by then.

Both Sinclair and Tribune own many TV stations. You just got a taste of how each company by itself owns several stations in several cities, and that number grows very large – too large for federal regulations – if combined. That means some stations will have to be spun off.

As I’ve written, Fox has wanted to buy several of those stations, especially Fox affiliates in cities with NFL football teams. Both Sinclair and Tribune own several Fox affiliates.

map seattle sacramento san diego salt lake city denver clevelend miami

According to Deadline magazine last month,

“Fox is in talks to acquire at least six stations from Sinclair, a source confirms. Discussions center Tribune-owned Fox affiliates in five markets — Seattle (KCPQ), Denver (KDVR), Salt Lake City (KSTU), Sacramento (KTXL) and Cleveland (WJW) — and a CW affiliate in greater Miami (WSFL) … contingent upon Sinclair winning regulatory approval for its $3.9 billion Tribune acquisition.”

Whether Fox will get to buy those stations remains to be seen. That’s because:

— Sinclair is already the nation’s largest TV station owner, based on the number of Americans its stations reach. That’s how the count goes, and Sinclair wants as many different people watching its stations – or able to pick them up – as possible. It probably won’t sell more than what’s necessary.

— Of course, it helps to own more than one station in a city, since synergies can save millions of dollars. As a small example, the company will only need one person to answer the phone. Both companies have pushed the legal limit on duopolies, and Sinclair has already asked for waivers. Again, it probably won’t sell more than what’s necessary.

— Fox will need money to buy all those stations, and it planned to sell its film, television, 22 regional sports networks and international businesses to Disney for $52.4 billion – but that plan is no longer certain.

There could be two stumbling blocks for Fox to sell everything but its broadcast network, TV stations, news and business channels, and its FS1/FS2 cable channels.

Reuters reported a group called Protect Democracy Project sued in District Court in Washington for any records of communications on the deal between the White House and the Justice Department, plus “any related antitrust enforcement efforts by the DOJ, to find out whether the president or his administration is improperly interfering with the independence of the DOJ out of favoritism for a political ally.”

According to White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders, President Trump attacked AT&T’s $85.4 billion bid for Time Warner. However, he even spoke to Fox owner Rupert Murdoch in December and congratulated him on his Disney deal!

at&t time warner

Fox owns Fox News Channel, which Trump likes, and Time-Warner owns CNN, which the president does not like.

The other problem with the Fox-Disney deal is that it included Fox’s stake in Sky Plc, over in the U.K. The Sporting News called the British satellite broadcaster “one of the most attractive and important assets in the Disney-Fox deal.”

sky news logo

Fox owns 39 percent of it and “has been in a more than year-long fight with regulators in the U.K. to … buy out the remaining 61%” for $15 billion but late last month, Comcast outbid Fox, offering $31 billion for Sky. That’s 16 percent more.

comcast
March 7

Funny thing is, Comcast had originally even offered more than Disney for all those Fox assets but was rejected!

But let’s be clear on Federal Communications Commission rules on broadcast ownership limits.

fcc logo

It says the FCC

“sets limits on the number of broadcast stations – radio and TV – an entity can own, as well as limits on the common ownership of broadcast stations and newspapers. As required by Congress, the FCC reviews its media ownership rules every four years to determine whether the rules are in the public interest and to repeal or modify any regulation it determines does not meet this criteria.”

*Newspaper and Broadcast Station Cross-Ownership: No “common ownership of a full-power broadcast station and daily newspaper if” the station completely encompasses the newspaper’s city of publication, and they’re in the same Nielsen market, except if the newspaper or broadcast station is failed or failing (or they were grandfathered in). I’ve even come out in support of Fox saving the New York Post from extinction!

*National TV Ownership: No limit on the number of TV stations. (It used to be five.) Now,

“a single entity may own nationwide so long as the station group collectively reaches no more than 39 percent of all U.S. TV households. For the purposes of calculating the ‘national audience reach,’ TV stations on UHF channels (14 and above) count less than TV stations operating on VHF channels (13 and below), this is also known as the UHF Discount.”

generic tvThe UHF Discount – established in 1985, according to Variety – only mattered when we used antennas because UHF stations had weaker signals and were harder to watch. That’s why they only counted half as much as a VHF station. (It wasn’t until 1965 that the FCC required all new TV sets sold in the U.S. to have built-in UHF tuners to receive channels 14+!)

In 2016, the FCC led by Democrats discontinued it because with digital broadcasting, along with cable and satellite, it’s not needed anymore. But big broadcasters wanted to grow larger than the 39 percent rule would allow (especially Ion Media, a major UHF group). In April 2017, the FCC led by Republicans brought it back!

Ajit Pai fcc wikipedia
Ajit Pai (Wikipedia)

The reason was (arguably) to allow the Sinclair-Tribune merger, and FCC chairman Ajit Pai – appointed by President Trump – is under investigation by his agency’s inspector general for his role in that. (Considering today’s technology, can you think of any other reason the FCC brought it back?) Then, in December 2017, the “FCC voted … to launch a review of the FCC’s national 39% broadcast audience reach cap,” according to Broadcasting & Cable magazine. B&C also reported Pai claimed “he was restoring the discount … to consider it in tandem with the (39 percent) cap.” Plus,

“We need to take a holistic look at the national cap rule, including the UHF discount,” Pai said of the item. “The marketplace has changed considerably due to the explosion of video programming options and various technological advances that have occurred since the cap was last considered in 2004. So we need to examine whether our rules should change accordingly.  That’s an important discussion that will be informed by the facts in the record—not anything else.”

It also quoted dissenting Commissioner Mignon Clyburn as saying,

“Giving a single broadcaster the means to buy up enough local stations to exceed the 39% cap is inconsistent with the statute and must be rejected.”

*Dual TV Network Ownership: No merger between ABC, CBS, Fox, and NBC. Remember how NBC’s old Red and Blue radio networks were separated?

*Local TV Multiple Ownership: A company can own up to two TV stations in the same area if either:tv airwaves

*The service areas – known as the digital noise limited service contour – of the stations do not overlap. (I take this to mean Grade B overlaps, where people living in between two markets – like central New Jersey in between New York and Philadelphia, and Boca Raton in between Miami and West Palm Beach – can pick up stations in both cities that are owned by the same company. But, for example, CBS owns stations in New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore, so there must’ve been waivers.)

girl watching tv     *At least one of the stations is not ranked among the top four stations in the DMA (based on audience share), and at least eight independently owned TV stations would remain in the market after the proposed combination. This is important: ratings and number of competitors. Keep them in mind as you read further. According to Wiley on Media, “The Commission determined that a minimum of eight independently owned and operated television stations was required to preserve competition in local television markets” and “The FCC concluded that top four station combinations had the potential to provide a single firm with an unacceptably high market share.” This is why Sinclair-Tribune can’t simply keep the two highest-rated stations in a big city if the sale goes through, or more than one in a smaller city.

*Local Radio/TV Cross-Ownership: Restrictions are based on a sliding scale that varies by the size of the market.

*In markets with at least 20 independently owned “media voices” (defined as full power TV stations and radio stations, major newspapers, and the cable system in the market) an entity can own up to two TV stations and six radio stations (or one TV station and seven radio stations).

*In markets with at least 10 independently owned “media voices” an entity can own up to two TV stations and four radio stations.

*In the smallest markets an entity may own two TV stations and one radio station.

*Local Radio Ownership: Restrictions are also based on a sliding scale that varies by the size of the market, but there’s no need to go into it here.

So the bottom line for now is that at this point, we’re learning some more about what Sinclair and Tribune intend to do with other stations they won’t be allowed to keep if their deal goes through — but whether their deal goes through — and whether Fox is able to buy the stations it wants because Comcast outbid Disney for Sky, but still needs approval — is up in the air(waves).

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P.S. In the spirit of weather, here were Casey and Frisky yesterday. As usual, Frisky (left) was more interested in Mother Nature’s show than Casey (right).