Reports: Nexstar says no to WPIX-NY, WSFL-Miami

If you want to do something well, watch someone else do it. That’s the way to improve in most skills in life.

ftvlive logo

That’s one reason I read Scott Jones’ blog, FTVLive.com. Say what you want about him or his spelling, but he’s usually right on the money when it comes to facts, and won’t make claims without backing them up. In other words, I trust what he writes.

This morning, he had two blog posts about the latest attempt to create the nation’s largest local television station owner: Nexstar Media Group’s effort to buy Tribune Media. (Last year, after a lot of opposition, Sinclair Broadcast Group was not allowed to make the purchase.)

When you get this big, things get complicated. The company gets up against against Federal Communications Commission ownership limits, as well as Department of Justice antitrust regulations.

Nexstar owns or operates 174 television stations in 100 mostly small to mid-sized TV markets, reaching nearly 38.7 percent of American households. The limit is 39 percent, and that’s with the FCC’s UHF discount, which only takes half the market’s people into account. Tribune owns or operates 42 stations, including the nation’s biggest cities.

The deal is that Nexstar will pay $4.1 billion for Tribune. Sinclair had offered $3.9 billion but according to USA Today, “breached its contract by misleading regulators during the transaction’s approval process.” Nexstar’s last major purchase was in 2017, when it bought 71 stations from Media General for $4.6 billion.

The ownership limits, which I explained in this post from last March, come into play because two large companies will already own stations in the same markets competing against each other, and will together own too many as a whole. That’s why some stations will need to be sold.

Briefly, the four categories of FCC rules are 1. national TV ownership, 2. local TV multiple ownership, 3. the number of independently owned “media voices” – 4. and at least one of the stations is not ranked among the top four stations in the DMA (that’s the “designated market area” or city, and ranking based on audience share), and at least eight independently owned TV stations would remain in the market after the proposed combination. (Keep in mind, these rules seem to get loosened every time a company comes close to hitting the limit.)

In the case of Nexstar and Tribune, there would be a long list involving about 15 cities. (Nexstar would do well by being honest in its effort to buy Tribune, as opposed to what Sinclair did and had been doing for years.)

sinclair skull and crossbones

Perry Sook, Nexstar’s president and CEO, started the company in 1996 with one station in Scranton, Pa. He has been buying ever since.

“We have no aspirations to be a national anything,” Sook said, according to Variety. “Our company goes from Burlington, Vermont to Honolulu and each of those communities have different needs and different tastes. We do three things that are vitally important: We produce local news content. We deliver entertainment and information. And we help local businesses sell stuff. Those are our reasons to exist.”

That’s contrary to Sinclair, which was reportedly interested in creating a national news network and using must-runs on its stations to spread its ownership’s conservative beliefs.

feature nexstar wpix wsfl

Anyway, this morning, Scott wrote,

“Sources tell FTVLive that Nexstar is not planning on keeping WPIX in New York City after it purchases the station as part of the Tribune deal.”

So if Nexstar pretty-much owns so many stations in small to mid-sized TV markets, and claims to be solely interested in local broadcasting (while probably taking advantage of some scale), why leave out a station in the #1 TV market in the country, which itself broadcasts to about a whopping six percent of American households?

WPIX

According to Scott,

“The spinning off of WPIX will help bring Nexstar under the ownership cap and it will likely put a lot of money back into the Nexstar back account.”

I’d rather see competition remain in New York. I can’t imagine Nexstar losing the power of selling ads on stations in every one of the biggest, influential, most lucrative cities (New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Washington, etc.). And it could probably make money selling off many of its smaller market stations, have fewer people doing the same jobs on payroll, pay less for benefits like health insurance, have less regulatory paperwork to do, etc. But it could possibly achieve what Scott suggested in just one move.

Instead of Nexstar, I dread a New York competitor coming in and gutting WPIX’s news department, which has grown over the years from 30 minutes at 7:30pm and an hour at 10, to include morning and early evening news.

Among competitors, WCBS already owns WLNY (Long Island). WNBC already owns WNJU (Telenundo). WNYW (Fox) bought WWOR and got rid of its news department. That pretty much leaves WABC, which is said to be in the buying mood since owner Disney hasn’t bought stations in years, is not up against ownership limits, and has been said to be interested in Cox’s stations (especially its ABC affiliates in Atlanta, Orlando and Charlotte). A duopoly in New York would be good for WABC, but not the public, which owns the airwaves. But considering the other major stations already own second stations in the Big Apple, could WABC be refused?

disney abc logo

Of course, Disney/ABC is already buying most of 21st Century Fox’s assets, including its TV and movie studios, and cable channels except news and business, for $71 billion. The New York Post reports the closing is expected in February or March, and Sinclair may end up buying Fox’s regional sports networks which Disney can’t keep (it already owns ESPN) and nobody else seems to want them.

The so-called New Fox would consist only of its TV stations, and its news and business cable channels. (Comcast/NBC wanted Fox’s entertainment assets but Disney/ABC offered more. Comcast is ending up with Fox’s share of European telecommunications and pay-TV giant Sky.)

Scott also wrote,

“Along with spinning off WPIX in New York, Nexstar plans on selling off WSFL, the Tribune station in Miami.”

We’ve been through this before. Fox has a great Miami affiliate, WSVN, which is owned by Ed Ansin’s Sunbeam Television Corporation. In the 1980s, he wouldn’t sell to then-affiliate partner NBC, so the peacock bought WTVJ in early 1987 and took away WSVN’s #1 primetime programming on Jan. 1, 1989. WSVN became a Fox affiliate on the few days the new network broadcast back then and put its future into local news, more sensational back then, which has worked out well.

WHDH logo 4Then, just a few years ago, the same thing happened with Sunbeam’s WHDH in Boston. Ansin refused to sell to NBC so the peacock invented a station pretty much from scratch to put its programming. Since Boston already had a Fox affiliate (Miami’s went to CBS in 1989), WHDH is now completely independent, without a network, and worth much less.

Fox TV stationsSo Fox has been selling off assets but is interested in buying TV stations (it had a deal to buy several from Sinclair after its merger with Tribune, which ended up falling through) and rights to live programming, especially sports and especially the National Football League. In the past, Fox wanted stations in cities with NFC teams because it broadcasts NFC team away games on Sunday afternoons. Then, it bought the rights to Thursday Night Football, which includes the whole league, so now it’s interested in stations in cities with AFC teams, like the Miami Dolphins.

I’ve shown you how networks have dumped highly-rated, loyal, long-time affiliate stations and went all-out to own stations in cities around the country, even if it meant starting a news department from nothing, which is exactly what WSFL has when it comes to news.

Why would Nexstar sell Tribune’s only Florida station when it doesn’t have much to show for itself in the Sunshine State? Good question! Nexstar only owns WFLA in Tampa, WKRG in Mobile/Pensacola and WMBB in Panama City. Maybe it knows it could get a great deal from Fox (perhaps part of a multi-station deal where Nexstar and Tribune have too many stations competing), or it knows global warming will have Florida under water sooner rather than later.

 

One thing I disagree on with Scott about Fox possibly buying WSFL is that WSVN would probably not exchange affiliations with that current CW affiliate and become the new one. That’s because CBS is a part owner of The CW and that affiliation would likely go to its second Miami station, WBFS, which would probably mean WSVN ends up with WBFS’ MyNetworkTV affiliation.

On the other hand, Philadelphia MyNetworkTV affiliate WPHL (owned by Tribune) airs off-network syndicated reruns from 8 to 10pm (a great idea!) and its MyNetworkTV obligations (pretty much syndicated dramas) air overnight. It also got rid of the “My” on its logo.

That’s the case because I verified WBFS-Miami and WWOR-New York air the same shows from 8 to 10pm (and Fox owns both WWOR and MyNetworkTV, so the shows will definitely run in pattern).

wphl wbfs wwor

Anson’s WHDH – which has been independent for two years – airs Family Feud for an hour at 8 and local news from 9 to 11:35pm. So there are alternatives.

What’s going to happen? Are the reports from Scott true? If so, are they subject to change?

Again, we’ll have to sit back on our couches, and wait and see.

Disappointing news and news coverage

Last night, a woman was shot to death two blocks from my parents (and where I lived from the end of kindergarten, to leaving WSVN and moving to Connecticut, minus my three college years). It happened at about 5pm. I found out when my sister-in-law sent me a TV station’s screen-grab.

Turns out, the victim was a well-known real estate agent, who’d had her face and her dog’s on many bus benches while I was growing up. It happened outside her daughter’s house (same high school, two years older) and the gunman was her estranged son-in-law, who later killed himself.

In the early evening, between 7:30 and 8:30pm, I couldn’t find anything on WSVN’s website, and nonsense with very few facts from the network-owned stations.

WTVJ was a block off and WFOR had no location.

WPLGWPLG had the best coverage, with the right block, and video with a reporter at the scene during its newscast which ended at 6:30. But supposedly, the latest was on a different reporter’s personal, private Facebook page. We never met, but I went to school with his brother years ago, so he’s from the area and has contacts. I found out about his Facebook coverage when I got a call from one of our dozens of mutual friends (28, to be exact), and asked him about it – on Facebook.

Me: “Why did you put Highland Lakes shooting privately on your personal page, but not on your professional page for any interested parties?”

Him: “The station posts on my public”

Me: “I’m sorry. That sucks.”

Him: “Ok sorry”

Me: “I meant for you. I’m sure not everything they’ve posted has been perfect, or the way you would have.”

He doesn’t know what I do and have done for a living, and you see he didn’t realize I felt sorry for him apparently not being able to publish on social media pages that have his name and picture, and depending on others to do it right! His public Facebook page hasn’t been used in almost a month, and his work Twitter account was only used sporadically, not a few times daily like someone with contacts who goes out in the field, working to uncover facts – or simply a trusted reporter who watches the news and has followers who depend on him.

We know people on-air are not decision-makers but they should be trusted to publish on pages with their names and pictures, along with certain folks in the newsroom. Those people on-air with their names and pictures online will probably be the best at making sure what’s reported there is accurate and presented properly.

Who else would care as much?

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Famous man, 80, suing famous man, 77, for age discrimination

What’s famous to you obviously relies on where you’ve been and what you’ve noticed, but these people have had national exposure for at least part of their long working lives.

It took longer than a New York minute, but Howard Stern would be happy to hear Warner Wolf is suing Don Imus — and it has to do with a radio program that’s about to go off the air (due to age?).

Wolf, 80, is best known as the WCBS-TV sportscaster who popularized the phrase “Let’s go to the videotape!”

Shock jock Imus, 77, may be most popular for being Stern’s arch-enemy.

Wolf claims he was fired from Imus’ radio show — which is ending, anyway — due to age discrimination.

The Associated Press reported Wolf’s suit, filed Thursday, claimed “Imus once said it was time to put Wolf ‘out to pasture’ and ‘shoot him with an elephant dart gun.’”

WABC-AMWolf is also suing three executives with WABC-770 AM and its parent company Cumulus Media for not paying Wolf his $97,500 severance. The suit called that “adding insult to injury.” Neither Imus nor a spokeswoman for Cumulus commented.

The actual firing happened in 2016.

The New York Daily News reports the Imus-Wolf trouble really started a few months before the 2016 firing when Wolf moved to Naples, Fla., and contributed to the show from there.

According to The Daily News, “You asked me if I was ok with you doing sports from Florida. I said I was. We tried it. It sucks,” Imus emailed shortly before Wolf’s final appearance on Nov. 4. “If you’re in the studio in New York … it’s terrific. Anything else is not.”

Keep in mind, Imus himself left the Big Apple a year earlier, in 2015, to live on a Texas ranch! The rest of the crew works in New York.

imus in the morning Pinterest

This is the background: Imus worked for several New York stations — “up and down the dial,” as WKRP in Cincinnati’s theme song lyrics go — and also in different cities. He was fired from WNBC-660 AM in 1977 but rehired in 1979, where Stern was his co-worker for a few years. Imus stayed as the station became WFAN-660 AM and lasted all the way until 2007. In the 1990s, the show became nationally syndicated and also began simulcasting on MSNBC.

(The three major networks’ radio stations have been sold off: The NBC radio stations under new owner General Electric in the late 1980s, although Westwood One — owner of Mutual Broadcasting System — bought the NBC Radio Network name. Then, Westwood One entered into an operations agreement with Infinity Broadcasting, which CBS parent Westinghouse bought, so all the stations became combined and CBS Radio people produced “Mutual” and “NBC”-branded newscasts! NBC News Radio broadcasts returned and they’ve been produced by iHeartMedia since last year. By the way, ABC sold off its division to Citadel Broadcasting — now part of Cumulus Media — in 2007, and CBS Radio was just sold to Entercom this past November, 2017.)

Oct. 7, 1988: WNBC-TV reporting live at the end of WNBC-660 AM after 66 years. Roger Grimsby worked for WNBC-TV at the time. The TV station had to dump out of his recorded piece to catch the last seconds before the switchover. Weatherman Al Roker interviews Imus at a rainy Shea Stadium since WFAN was and is all-sports. It was a different and much better world when stations and on-air talent were allowed to have distinct personalities. Now, everything looks the same — city to city — but I’ve gone off on corporate ownership here, here, here and here (starting with the most recent).

dcrtvcoms warner wolf tribute
http://www.dcrtv.com/plus/wolf.html

Wolf became famous doing local sports at his hometown Washington, DC’s WTOP-TV.

kane wolf chee chee williams christian
(L-R) My friend and former KYW-TV co-worker Larry Kane, Warner Wolf, Chee Chee Williams, Spencer Christian before Good Morning America (WABC-TV, 1978)

In the 1970s, he went national on ABC-TV’s Monday Night Baseball and the Olympics but returned to his local sportscasting roots, on WABC-TV in New York.

warner baseball localThen, he switched to competitor WCBS-TV and returned to WUSA-TV in Washington (the former WTOP) until his 1995 firing.WFAN

That’s when he became acquainted with Imus, subbing as sports anchor on the Imus in the Morning show on WFAN and simulcast on MSNBC.

Wolf returned to WCBS-TV in 1997. You may have seen him almost lose one of his dentures in 1998 when it popped out on camera. I was producing the 11pm news at Connecticut’s CBS affiliate WFSB during that time and chose not to embarrass Wolf by showing it. Besides, our viewers in Fairfield and New Haven counties had access to WCBS-TV, so his station was also our competition. Little did I realize, The Daily News reported, “A few days later, he brought a pair of clicking teeth onto the air with him to poke fun at the incident.”

He stayed there until his 2004 firing, when he was replaced by the younger Chris Wragge, who since then has moved over to news.

wabc am 2The outcry over Wolf’s firing got him hired by WABC-AM, where he worked on a show with Guardian Angel Curtis Sliwa, and defense and civil rights lawyer Ron Kuby.

In the meantime, WFAN fired the controversial, irreverent, insulting Imus in 2007. Imus had made racist and sexist comments about the Rutgers University women’s basketball team (“nappy-headed hoes” and more). Got all that?

wabc am 1Months later, Imus was hired by WABC-AM — reunited at the same station as Wolf — and after about two weeks, Wolf became his sportscaster again!

In late 2009, the show started being simulcast on the Fox Business Network. That lasted until 2015 when Imus moved to Texas. The next year, Wolf moved to Florida and that supposedly led to his firing.

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Imus Extra with Warner Wolf, 2015 (YouTube)

Wolf was replaced with another colorful sportscaster, Sid Rosenberg, who is only in his early 50s. The Miami Herald’s Greg Cote referred to Rosenberg with the phrase “drugs, alcohol and gambling leading to a history of erratic behavior, suspensions and firings.”

twitter sidrosenberg
twitter.com/sidrosenberg

Whatever you say about Rosenberg, he has been back and forth between New York and Florida.WNEW-FM

Rosenberg worked in West Palm Beach and in 2000, returned to New York at WNEW-FM 102.7, which has since changed formats.

After that, he worked mornings at WFAN on Imus — ironically with Wolf — but there was trouble on the set in the studio. After a few months, Rosenberg added duties as co-host of the midday show.

He was controversial on Imus — with remarks about the Williams sisters, tennis players and the U.S. women’s national soccer team — but fired after making crude remarks about Australian singer Kylie Minogue’s breast cancer diagnosis.

WAXY-AMRosenberg found himself back in Florida — at Miami radio station WAXY-790 AM The Ticket for four years — but still, he called in to WFAN and even served as a substitute sportscaster! It was Rosenberg who reported on Rutgers in 2007, which led to Imus and his producer’s remarks, and their firings.

WQAMIn 2009, Rosenberg jumped to competitor WQAM-560 AM (replacing Neil Rogers middays and Jim Mandich on the Miami Dolphins post-game show), but was fired in 2012 after a DUI arrest in Hollywood.

sid rosenberg Broward County Jail
Courtesy Broward County Jail

The Broward-Palm Beach New Times reported,

“According to police, Rosenberg — the WQAM-AM (560) host whose license hath been suspended thrice — was really, really drunk when he said he was on his way home from Tootsie’s Cabaret, the Miami Gardens full-nudity strip club. … Two Hollywood police officers found Rosenberg sitting in the driver’s seat of his 2011 GMC Yukon — the driver’s side door was open, and the engine was running. Oh, and he was parked in the middle of 63rd Avenue. They called a third officer, Jon Cooke, who ended up writing the police report.”

Then scroll through and read details from the Booking Report.

Booking report from Broward-Palm Beach New Times reporter Rich Abdill via Broward Sheriff’s Office

“When I arrived, I discovered the arrestee laying on the ground behind his vehicle. He was in the fetal position, with his fingers in his mouth. He appeared to be attempting to induce himself to vomit. I noticed vomit on his clothes, as well as inside and next to the driver door of his vehicle. I noticed a strong odor of an alcoholic beverage emanating from his breath and person. His speech was extremely slurred and he was crying. His face was flushed and his eyes were bloodshot.”

He was also charged with driving with a suspended license. It was his first offense on each count.

WMEN-AMThat’s when he ended up at Palm Beach sports radio station WMEN-640 AM.

Rosenberg stayed until becoming co-host of The Bernie and Sid Show on — you guessed it — WABC-AM! That was in January, 2016. In November, he replaced the fired Wolf on Imus.

bernie sid wabc

But last month, Imus announced the show would air its final episode on March 29.

What a crazy business! It has to be, with such crazy people.

 

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don imus time magazine

autobiographies

 

The news about Brian Williams, according to me

WCAU NBC10 Philadelphia breaking news blue light shirt back
A former news director at WCAU-NBC10 Philadelphia decided to put up blue lights around the newsroom…
WCAU NBC10 Philadelphia breaking news blue light shirt front
… to alert everyone that breaking news was happening. The event was actually commemorated with tee-shirts.

Breaking news! Literally! Sound the alarm! Roll the animation! Shine the blue lights!

Right now, as I’m writing this planned blog post, NBC News has announced it’s suspending Nightly News anchor Brian Williams for 6 months without his pay of $10 million a year.

NBCNews.com
NBCNews.com

The memo from NBC News president Deborah Turness said in part: “Brian misrepresented events which occurred while he was covering the Iraq War in 2003. It then became clear that on other occasions Brian had done the same while telling that story in other venues. This was wrong and completely inappropriate for someone in Brian’s position.”

In the same memo, NBC Universal’s CEO Steve Burke said what Williams did is ” inexcusable and this suspension is severe and appropriate,” but Burke also said Williams “deserves a second chance and we are rooting for him.”

I don’t remember anything like this ever happening. The one incident that comes to mind involved one of Williams’ most public defenders, Dan Rather. He left CBS News after about half a century for a disputed news report on President George W. Bush‘s Vietnam-era National Guard service.NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams logo

The Williams saga has brought out many allegations and questions about the newsman, the news process, and other famous people. People have taken sides and made predictions. Many said Williams would’ve been fired immediately if his newscast wasn’t in first place. Now, hopefully, that will all be put to rest.

It took days after the allegations were revealed to the nation, but NBC finally started investigating him. Now, the network made up its mind and not a minute too soon.

I’m not going to get into all the details about what happened, but I have some thoughts:

  • Saturday, Williams put out a statement that he’d be off the air for a few days because he was making too much news. It contained the line, “Lester Holt has kindly agreed to sit in for me.” Oh come on! Kindly agreed? It’s a promotion and a lot more prestigious! Who wouldn’t do that? The job is the same. He would just move from double-shift weekends to a better schedule on weekdays. Who really wrote that?
  • Williams plummeted from the 23rd most trusted celebrity in the country, all the way down to number 835. That’s according to The Marketing Arm, which polls consumers to track celebrity perception – and pretty quick. (The list is not public. Learn more here.)
  • The New York tabloids have been covering Williams constantly. This morning, the New York Post reported top-level NBC executives were meeting in head honcho Burke’s apartment, deciding what to do, but Williams wasn’t invited. Last Thursday, the Post reported Tom Brokaw wanted Williams out, but Brokaw later denied it. Don’t forget the Post is owned by news rival Fox. Don’t you think they have an interest in getting rid of NBC’s #1 anchor?2015-02-07 Lenny's Facebook post on CNN & Brian Williams
  • Not that CNN is any better. On Sunday on Facebook, I questioned why CNN should be taking so many shots at Williams when it has been labeling its recorded video as live for so long. This morning, FTV Live noted CNN media correspondent Brian Stelter had posted 25 stories on the Web about Williams, and talked about it ad nauseam, yet was so reserved when CNN’s own anchor Fareed Zakaria was caught committing numerous instances of plagiarism.

Back to my previous point: Nobody is perfect. Reporting is one thing, but nobody should be throwing stones. We all deserved better. Many have lots to learn. And the audience is probably watching the news a little differently now.

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I don’t know Brian Williams personally, but was in the same room as him once. It was 1991 or so. I was up in New York interviewing for a position as a CBS page. Brian was anchoring the local news on Channel 2. I was getting a tour of the newsroom and he was on the other side, getting ready for the noon show. (Little did I know at that time, you have to know someone to become a CBS page!)

He also used to work at Channel 10 in Philadelphia, but well before my time and when it was owned by a different network.NBC News logo

Now, everyone is coming out of the woodwork to show Williams hasn’t been perfect. Who is? If he committed such big sins in the past, then why weren’t they reported at the time? There are reports NBC was notified about the Iraq War story years ago. If that’s true, then the network is at least as guilty.

CBS puts on a first-class newscast, even if it’s not first in the ratings. On the other hand, it seems ABC’s producers would rather show amazing, can’t-miss video than put on serious newscasts. Poor David Muir! I’m glad I’m not him. And Good Morning America has turned into a party I would definitely skip.

February, 2012
February, 2012

Lester Holt will continue as NBC’s substitute anchor. I like Holt. He got a raw deal from WBBM in Chicago, but certainly got the last laugh! He has the credentials, has done well on weekend mornings AND evenings (two very different broadcasts), so he should get the gig if Williams eventually loses it.

But I like Williams. I think he does a good job as anchor. In fact, I hope he makes it, only to show second chances are possible.
And I hope he’s better after it.