The end of an era, and beginning of this one (Part A of this one)

It was 20 years ago tonight. Not exactly. It was actually four days off, on Nov. 25, but what really matters is it was the night before Thanksgiving in 1998.

I had been producing the 11pm news at CBS affiliate WFSB-3 in Connecticut. It was my last newscast there, before moving to Philadelphia – and also the last weathercast for the legendary Hilton Kaderli, who retired that night.

In fact, Hilton and I just got off the phone. He and his family are doing great. He mentioned he had just been doing a bit of work in his study, and his wife is working on their Thanksgiving turkey as I publish this!

The reason for both of us leaving the same night was, back then, TV stations depended on Nielsen ratings. That company picked times around four months to measure viewership. Then, starting on a Thursday and ending on a Wednesday – every November, February, May and July – networks and stations would go all out to show you their best programming along with their sexiest, dirtiest, most dangerous and practically anything to get you to watch. No vacations were allowed, so the A-team would be on every newscast, every day and night.

In 1998 – for the first and last time, I believe – Nielsen ended the ratings period on the night before Thanksgiving rather than the week before, postponing or canceling news people’s vacation plans.

Thanksgiving
We were all turkeys in 1998!

Stations still use those times to have their on-air people announce retirements, reveal health issues, and more to get you to watch – even though Nielsen now realizes there are more than four months in a year, and doesn’t ask randomly selected viewers to fill out diaries about what they watch anymore. Old habits are hard to break.

The 11pm news was arguably most important (financially, why else?) because it followed the network’s huge primetime audience, and had 35 minutes to fill commercials, rather than the typical 30 for a half hour. Stations would then sell ads based on the ratings for at least the next few months, while also looking at year-to-year. People’s jobs depended on good ratings.

This was my first job outside of Florida, my first time in New England cold and my first time living away from home (except for college).

Downtown Hartford was basically a dead center of a doughnut, but not the night before Thanksgiving. (Why weren’t we live from outside?) The day before Thanksgiving was still busy with travel. (Yes, we had a live picture.)

Since then, the station moved from there, two towns south to Rocky Hill. (Yes, Weathersfield and Rocky Hill are towns, while Hartford is a city!)

These days, Al Terzi – the dean of Connecticut TV news, who actually spent some time in West Palm Beach – moderates a weekly political show on WTIC-Fox 61. Denise D’Ascenzo is still at it at Channel 3 after 32 years (and will always be my shiksa sister!), but gets to drive home at a decent hour. No more Nightbeat for her! We can all see and hear Joe Tessitore on ESPN’s Monday Night Football.

I thank Tom Lowell, Steve Sabato and Deborah Johnson for the opportunity. I followed Tom up from Miami.

Plus, my friend Megan Robinson who followed me up and started producing weekend mornings, before becoming an executive producer in Charlotte. We went to dinner every Sunday night in a different town so we could study the state we covered.

Reporters Dennis House (now anchoring and also blogging, so I get a weekly email to keep up with the area!), Jennifer Watson (in Atlanta), Melissa Francis (Fox Business) and Susan Raff (still there!) found news or followed up on developing stories, sometimes live so late and further away than they would’ve liked to have been.

In the beginning of my time at WFSB, someone you may have heard of – Gayle King – returned from home and her then-little ones to anchor after her 5:30 newscast because Denise was on maternity leave. (Now, that means her baby girl is old enough to drink!) Of course, Gayle went on to the syndicated Gayle King Show and now anchors CBS This Morning.

Assignment editor Andre Hepkins left WFSB and returned as a reporter. Now, he’s a big-time anchor in Baltimore. And Dana Luby kept getting promotion after promotion and recently went from long-time news director of the station to its general manager! Plus, Mike Guerrieri (Vice President of Creative Services at NBC’s Miami station) with the prime-time teases that kept so many viewers up longer than they would’ve liked.

Of course, I’ll never forget the late, great newscast director Jeff Bright. And I’ll never be able to mention everyone whose work went into making the newscast such a success, so please forgive me.

We were a #1 team. I should’ve made more of it. Come to think of it, I think I fought like hell with every one of the people mentioned at least once (except Gayle)! Every one of cared that much and made each other better.

I mentioned I ended up moving to Philadelphia. I stayed six years, returned to Miami for some time before getting back to Philadelphia (for Part B, as this post’s title suggests).

Click here for how The Hartford Courant reported that day.

Now, to the video!

1 of 3: Lots of touches I remember starting, the New England Patriots’ move to Hartford(!), Hilton’s memories, and perhaps a record number of municipalities mentioned in the first tease instead of the typical three

2 of 3: Michael J. Fox reveals he has Parkinson’s and Hilton’s final forecast

3 of 3: Sports, Hilton’s final good-bye and classic clips

(Why didn’t I get an on-air mention after 19-1/2 months?)

Bonuses:

Gayle King’s friend Oprah joins Hilton on weather in 1992

And click here to read and watch the most memorable moment in WFSB history (at least involving Hilton)!

Plus, thank you to Spencer Medbery for providing most of the clips!

If you like what you read here, subscribe with either your email address or WordPress account, and get a notice whenever I publish. Don’t rely on social media with its hacking issues and censoring like thisthis and this. I’m also available for writing/web contract work. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lennycohen

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In defense: The good Facebook can do when used by the right people

First, happy Mother’s Day to everyone to whom that applies. I hope you’re having a great day!

casey frisky mothers day
You’ll have to excuse them. Casey and Frisky are still learning their colors.

Second, today is also the celebration of Yom Yerushalayim, or Jerusalem Day. It’s the Hebrew anniversary of when the Israelis recaptured the eastern/holy part of the city in the Six-Day War of 1967. It’s where no Arab country’s leader had visited except Jordan’s King Hussein, who’d “occupied” it 19 years earlier in 1948.

But then it suddenly became so important to them.

There is lots and lots to say about President Trump, but this post isn’t about him. Still, he is making the embassy move from Tel Aviv happen and no other American president has done so, despite being able. So thank you, President Trump.

Trump Jlem Day poster
Picture above and video below, courtesy Nyla

Israelis, naturally, are celebrating.

There’s an article written this weekend by former U.S. Ambassador to Israel Dan Shapiro (President Obama’s) and publicly supported by current U.S. Ambassador to Israel David Friedman (President Trump’s).

Shapiro, who is much more liberal, described the situation with a question:

“Why hasn’t the US ever recognized Jerusalem as Israel’s capital? Some people date it to the controversy that arose in 1967, when Israel captured East Jerusalem from Jordan in the Six-Day War and unified the city, describing it as a US protest against the Israeli ‘occupation’ of East Jerusalem. That’s wrong.

“The truth is that US policy on Jerusalem derives from events 20 years earlier, when the United Nations passed the Partition Plan for Palestine in November 1947.”

The two differ on many things but as my friend Andy, who pointed the article out, published:

“Good to see President Trump’s ambassador positively sharing an article by President Obama’s ambassador. Let’s keep support for Israel bipartisan.”

In the article, Shapiro described a day in the life of a U.S. Ambassador to Israel:

“Jerusalem had always been Israel’s capital, and we have always treated it functionally, if not formally, as such. When I served as the US Ambassador at our embassy in Tel Aviv, nearly every day I would be driven to Jerusalem to conduct affairs of state with the Israeli government at the Prime Minister’s office, the Foreign Ministry, and the Knesset.”

Then, he goes into a brief history of the complicated situation with Jerusalem at the center of it, describes a possible step towards solving an issue that has been delayed too many times over too many decades, and then how the embassy move could help end the century-old conflict. Let’s hope!

Also, Donald Trump’s face is featured on a ceremonial Israeli coin marking the 70th anniversary of the country’s rebirth.

It depicts Trump alongside the biblical King Cyrus of Persia, who allowed the Jews to return to Jerusalem 2,500 years ago, after King Nebuchadnezzar destroyed the first Temple (King Solomon’s) in 586 B.C. and exiled the Jews to Babylon.

Why does the other side try to claim there’s no Jewish history in Jerusalem? Who are they trying to fool? The answer is gullible haters who don’t want to believe it.

And onto the subject at hand, since I rarely write about myself and even more rarely write about personal subjects rather than professional ones.

Last week, I got a message on Facebook from someone I hadn’t seen in at least 30 years, and probably more like 40.

Technically, I’ve seen him on Facebook. We have several mutual friends, so we’ve seen each other commenting on their posts. (I’m speaking for myself, but can’t imagine the opposite not being true.) We were never really friendly growing up, even though we certainly knew each other.

The message went:

“Hi Lenny, I’m not sure of you remember me, but we grew up together. My memory may be off here, but I feel like I wasn’t always the nicest person to you and I really just want to apologize If I ever did or said anything to make you feel bad. You may not even recall this and maybe it’s more in my head. Anyhow, I just wanted to reach out and say hello. I hope you and your family are doing well. I remember your father very well. … He was always a really nice guy. Again, I know this is very random, but I saw your comment on _____’s post and just to reach out and say hello. Regards, _____”

Wow! Takes guts and a good person to write something like that. Very impressive!

I responded with a quick,

“No worries. I only remember good things. Hope you’re well. Thanks for writing!”

And we connected a few more times.old Lenny

The truth, as I remember it, is I was not happy growing up in Florida. Early on, I felt most of the people simply couldn’t make it in civilization, like New York.

You know what Frank Sinatra sang:

“If I can make it there,
I’ll make it anywhere.”

It was almost always too hot and humid. I wanted to stay inside and watch TV. I was a loner until high school.

Meanwhile, more people moved in to die. The area got more spread out and there was still traffic everywhere. Just Thursday, a friend posted this picture. It’s not downtown Miami but west of the airport.

The goal was to move to New York, which luckily – thanks to my parents – I didn’t do during college and never took on debt.

And instead of moving to New York, once I had enough career experience, I lived on both sides of it: almost two years in Connecticut and eight years in Philadelphia.

When I visit Florida, which hasn’t happened in more than a year, I feel even more like an outsider because of the language barrier. It’s a right-to-work state. Wages are low. So are taxes, even for people work in much better places and spend just 183 days a year there. On the other hand, insurance rates are sky high because of hurricanes and the water level will soon be, too.

south beach flood
Looking down from the 5th floor of my South Beach condo, at 11th and Alton, after about an hour of rain.

Plus, having the career I had and never letting up, I’ve become more of a homebody in recent years.

The writer, who was nice enough to contact me on Facebook, was not a jerk or bully or anything like that. There were some people like that and always will be, even though the world has changed and adults are supposed to be looking for more signs, these days.

And count on the politically-correct police, out in force, to make sure nobody ever feels bad, ever:

inclusive cheerleading
A friend found this article from New Jersey, last week, which you can click here to read and watch parts of the meeting.
2006 ncaa tournament chris christie philadelphia
Chris Christie would’ve never put up with that!

People are going to feel bad. That’s a fact of life. It’s not fair. I suggest you fight for what you believe most and try not to sweat the less important stuff. Forget about it, especially if you’re not sure it actually happened decades ago.

And I thank Facebook for the information above. I would not have had it otherwise.

We know the company has had issues – not just recently but for many years.

Yes, our personal information is their asset.

No, the company could’ve done more to protect it.

Yes, it’s trying to get its act together on security and news that gives facts.

No, it won’t be done soon. It’s a long work in progress with decisions still to be made.

Yes, I’ve written a lot on the subject!

But if it helps you reconnect with people from your past, parents see pictures of their kids in college, grandparents see pictures of their grandchildren, and lets people celebrate their moms on Mother’s Day, and see the excitement of Israelis thrilled about their capital city being reunited and what’s to come this week, then get on board and sign up.

You don’t have to use every function or app, or even a few – but you’re missing out if you’re too stubborn to say you won’t miss good things if you’re not on Facebook.

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Villanova Victory, Volume III

They did it again! Villanova University’s men’s basketball team is celebrating its second national championship in three years.

 

villanova from wikipedia

According to the school’s president, Rev. Peter M. Donohue, OSA,

“In 2016, it had been 31 years since our last national championship for basketball, and now, just two years later, Villanova is once again the national champion! What a remarkable accomplishment for the players and for Coach (Jay) Wright and his staff, and what a wonderful time to be a Villanovan!”

villanova from pinterest

It was around this time, two years ago, I was waiting for WTXF-Fox 29 to officially hire me. Of course, when you’re dealing with corporations, everything gets in the way.

I got this email from the news director, the day after the game.

jim email 2016

Of course, the first line didn’t end with a question mark or exclamation point. Different people are held to different standards.

Of course, he didn’t let me know “either way by Friday,” as he said. Villanova won on Monday, April 4, 2016. You can see he emailed this the next day, April 5. That Friday would’ve been April 8. Instead, I did not find out until Tuesday, April 12.

wcyb cakeThat same Tuesday, I gave my two weeks at WCYB, leaving there after April 26, and starting at Fox less than a week later, on May 2. I had been given the option of starting May 9 but knew there was a ratings period and wanted to be as much help as possible, as soon as possible. So I quickly got mover and cleaner estimates, and my friend Scott found a temporary place for me to stay. The good folks at WCYB made sure to honor me with a cake. Lots of people involved with my departure and arrival!

I’m sure Fox management appreciated that move I rushed – just like I appreciated the imaginary transportation, hotel and lunch they provided during my interview! (What’s the best emoji for sarcasm that covers everything about them in that last, long sentence?)

My time at Fox was not pleasant because they seemed to care more about nonsense social media that would pull at people’s heartstrings, rather than real, relevant news. They also did not take the 11-page critique they had asked me for into consideration. (Click here to see it.)

They did take my advice to use Facebook more often, but never thanked or acknowledged me in any way. I remember being told during my one face-to-face interview (Feb. 29, 2016) that one Facebook post an hour may be too much! In other words, exactly the opposite. Some people can never be satisfied. Maybe they’re too insecure.

Note: I think I’ve kept every emailed promise, accusation, etc. Some people won’t look very good if-when it all comes out. That’ll be up to our representatives. Same thing when all the witnesses start talking about their experiences. I left that place in the middle of nothing short of an exodus.

I must make public I hope I’m not infringing on the NCAA’s trademark nastiness by using words like Villanova and phrases like national championship.

wikipedia march madness
Wikipedia wrote this, not me. I don’t think the NCAA would consider it informal.

I also don’t think certain lawyers would agree there are “informal” uses, either!

linkedin

Click here for the article on the NCAA’s rules and what it’ll do to you if you break them!

Of course, let’s not forget what Villanova did to the school that the Miami Dolphins used as its training facility from 1970 to 1993.

The Main Line’s Villanova University was named after Saint Thomas of Villanova. It was founded in 1842 by the Order of Saint Augustine. The other school

“traces its roots to the Universidad de Santo Tomas de Villanueva (Saint Thomas of Villanova), founded in 1946 in Havana, Cuba, by American Augustinians with assistance from European Augustinians. When the Castro government expelled the Augustinians from Cuba in 1961, several of the American Augustinians came to Miami where they founded Biscayne College. … When University status was attained (in 1984), the name of the institution was changed to St. Thomas University to reflect its Cuban heritage.”

Another thing, friends, is you know I have a long memory.

name change
Published by the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami, Feb. 24. 1984, page 8, http://library.stu.edu/ulma/va/3005/1984/02-24-1984.pdf

That last line I quoted isn’t exactly true. Biscayne College didn’t become St. Thomas University; it became St. Thomas of Villanova University, but folks on the Main Line didn’t like that competition, so the name – How did they put it? – was shortened. I found it didn’t take more than a few months, and the second change wasn’t even mentioned in The Voice, Miami’s Catholic newspaper. I checked the 1984 issues. Seems they went through a lot of trouble for nothing.

the voice p 13
Published by the Catholic Archdiocese of Miami, page 13, http://library.stu.edu/ulma/va/3005/1986/10-03-1986.pdf

The shortened name used for such a short time even has an unofficial Facebook page, but not much is on it, as you probably would’ve expected!

fb St Thomas of Villanova University
https://www.facebook.com/pages/St-Thomas-of-Villanova-University-Miami/214773968652477
st thomas university florida wikipedia
Back to plain ‘ol St. Thomas University

As for me, I’ve never been a college basketball fan. Growing up in Miami, the University of Miami didn’t even have a team from around the time I was born until I was in 9th grade (you look the dates up!), so I didn’t grow up with it. Also, if you blink, the players are gone – either graduating, dropping out, or a few going professional. There’s no chance to remember more than a few individual players, unless you’re a die-hard fan or journalist (or live in Connecticut, where any high school stars are remembered forever).

But I loved when somebody I consider a mentor – Miami news legend Eliott Rodriguez – put his live shot from Vilanova’s 1985 championship up on Facebook, this morning. It happened while he worked for WPVI’s Channel 6 Action News, during a break from the Miami market.

You’ll have to watch. I commented jokingly, “Full of information! But other things never change.”

He responded, “The pictures tell the story,” but couldn’t remember whether he or his photographer suggested doing the live shot from the top of the van. Turns out, maybe they should’ve! And Jim Gardner always had the perfect response.

Jim is still there today and still in first place, even against the Super Bowl and Olympics on NBC in February. Says something about stability and being true to yourself, and what you stand for.

See who was referred to as a “distant fourth” twice in the above article! Let’s just agree it was well-deserved. Heck, they changed their Facebook policy between the time of my interview and the time I started. That wasn’t much more than two months!

And to leave you on a much more pleasant note, here’s a much more recent picture Eliott posted: Two former Philadelphia folks, including one who worked at KYW-TV3. It was taken in March. Glad to see Eliott and Marc Howard looking happy! Goes to show there is life after TV news!

elliot marc

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Famous man, 80, suing famous man, 77, for age discrimination

What’s famous to you obviously relies on where you’ve been and what you’ve noticed, but these people have had national exposure for at least part of their long working lives.

It took longer than a New York minute, but Howard Stern would be happy to hear Warner Wolf is suing Don Imus — and it has to do with a radio program that’s about to go off the air (due to age?).

Wolf, 80, is best known as the WCBS-TV sportscaster who popularized the phrase “Let’s go to the videotape!”

Shock jock Imus, 77, may be most popular for being Stern’s arch-enemy.

Wolf claims he was fired from Imus’ radio show — which is ending, anyway — due to age discrimination.

The Associated Press reported Wolf’s suit, filed Thursday, claimed “Imus once said it was time to put Wolf ‘out to pasture’ and ‘shoot him with an elephant dart gun.’”

WABC-AMWolf is also suing three executives with WABC-770 AM and its parent company Cumulus Media for not paying Wolf his $97,500 severance. The suit called that “adding insult to injury.” Neither Imus nor a spokeswoman for Cumulus commented.

The actual firing happened in 2016.

The New York Daily News reports the Imus-Wolf trouble really started a few months before the 2016 firing when Wolf moved to Naples, Fla., and contributed to the show from there.

According to The Daily News, “You asked me if I was ok with you doing sports from Florida. I said I was. We tried it. It sucks,” Imus emailed shortly before Wolf’s final appearance on Nov. 4. “If you’re in the studio in New York … it’s terrific. Anything else is not.”

Keep in mind, Imus himself left the Big Apple a year earlier, in 2015, to live on a Texas ranch! The rest of the crew works in New York.

imus in the morning Pinterest

This is the background: Imus worked for several New York stations — “up and down the dial,” as WKRP in Cincinnati’s theme song lyrics go — and also in different cities. He was fired from WNBC-660 AM in 1977 but rehired in 1979, where Stern was his co-worker for a few years. Imus stayed as the station became WFAN-660 AM and lasted all the way until 2007. In the 1990s, the show became nationally syndicated and also began simulcasting on MSNBC.

(The three major networks’ radio stations have been sold off: The NBC radio stations under new owner General Electric in the late 1980s, although Westwood One — owner of Mutual Broadcasting System — bought the NBC Radio Network name. Then, Westwood One entered into an operations agreement with Infinity Broadcasting, which CBS parent Westinghouse bought, so all the stations became combined and CBS Radio people produced “Mutual” and “NBC”-branded newscasts! NBC News Radio broadcasts returned and they’ve been produced by iHeartMedia since last year. By the way, ABC sold off its division to Citadel Broadcasting — now part of Cumulus Media — in 2007, and CBS Radio was just sold to Entercom this past November, 2017.)

Oct. 7, 1988: WNBC-TV reporting live at the end of WNBC-660 AM after 66 years. Roger Grimsby worked for WNBC-TV at the time. The TV station had to dump out of his recorded piece to catch the last seconds before the switchover. Weatherman Al Roker interviews Imus at a rainy Shea Stadium since WFAN was and is all-sports. It was a different and much better world when stations and on-air talent were allowed to have distinct personalities. Now, everything looks the same — city to city — but I’ve gone off on corporate ownership here, here, here and here (starting with the most recent).

dcrtvcoms warner wolf tribute
http://www.dcrtv.com/plus/wolf.html

Wolf became famous doing local sports at his hometown Washington, DC’s WTOP-TV.

kane wolf chee chee williams christian
(L-R) My friend and former KYW-TV co-worker Larry Kane, Warner Wolf, Chee Chee Williams, Spencer Christian before Good Morning America (WABC-TV, 1978)

In the 1970s, he went national on ABC-TV’s Monday Night Baseball and the Olympics but returned to his local sportscasting roots, on WABC-TV in New York.

warner baseball localThen, he switched to competitor WCBS-TV and returned to WUSA-TV in Washington (the former WTOP) until his 1995 firing.WFAN

That’s when he became acquainted with Imus, subbing as sports anchor on the Imus in the Morning show on WFAN and simulcast on MSNBC.

Wolf returned to WCBS-TV in 1997. You may have seen him almost lose one of his dentures in 1998 when it popped out on camera. I was producing the 11pm news at Connecticut’s CBS affiliate WFSB during that time and chose not to embarrass Wolf by showing it. Besides, our viewers in Fairfield and New Haven counties had access to WCBS-TV, so his station was also our competition. Little did I realize, The Daily News reported, “A few days later, he brought a pair of clicking teeth onto the air with him to poke fun at the incident.”

He stayed there until his 2004 firing, when he was replaced by the younger Chris Wragge, who since then has moved over to news.

wabc am 2The outcry over Wolf’s firing got him hired by WABC-AM, where he worked on a show with Guardian Angel Curtis Sliwa, and defense and civil rights lawyer Ron Kuby.

In the meantime, WFAN fired the controversial, irreverent, insulting Imus in 2007. Imus had made racist and sexist comments about the Rutgers University women’s basketball team (“nappy-headed hoes” and more). Got all that?

wabc am 1Months later, Imus was hired by WABC-AM — reunited at the same station as Wolf — and after about two weeks, Wolf became his sportscaster again!

In late 2009, the show started being simulcast on the Fox Business Network. That lasted until 2015 when Imus moved to Texas. The next year, Wolf moved to Florida and that supposedly led to his firing.

imus extra w wolf 2015 youtube
Imus Extra with Warner Wolf, 2015 (YouTube)

Wolf was replaced with another colorful sportscaster, Sid Rosenberg, who is only in his early 50s. The Miami Herald’s Greg Cote referred to Rosenberg with the phrase “drugs, alcohol and gambling leading to a history of erratic behavior, suspensions and firings.”

twitter sidrosenberg
twitter.com/sidrosenberg

Whatever you say about Rosenberg, he has been back and forth between New York and Florida.WNEW-FM

Rosenberg worked in West Palm Beach and in 2000, returned to New York at WNEW-FM 102.7, which has since changed formats.

After that, he worked mornings at WFAN on Imus — ironically with Wolf — but there was trouble on the set in the studio. After a few months, Rosenberg added duties as co-host of the midday show.

He was controversial on Imus — with remarks about the Williams sisters, tennis players and the U.S. women’s national soccer team — but fired after making crude remarks about Australian singer Kylie Minogue’s breast cancer diagnosis.

WAXY-AMRosenberg found himself back in Florida — at Miami radio station WAXY-790 AM The Ticket for four years — but still, he called in to WFAN and even served as a substitute sportscaster! It was Rosenberg who reported on Rutgers in 2007, which led to Imus and his producer’s remarks, and their firings.

WQAMIn 2009, Rosenberg jumped to competitor WQAM-560 AM (replacing Neil Rogers middays and Jim Mandich on the Miami Dolphins post-game show), but was fired in 2012 after a DUI arrest in Hollywood.

sid rosenberg Broward County Jail
Courtesy Broward County Jail

The Broward-Palm Beach New Times reported,

“According to police, Rosenberg — the WQAM-AM (560) host whose license hath been suspended thrice — was really, really drunk when he said he was on his way home from Tootsie’s Cabaret, the Miami Gardens full-nudity strip club. … Two Hollywood police officers found Rosenberg sitting in the driver’s seat of his 2011 GMC Yukon — the driver’s side door was open, and the engine was running. Oh, and he was parked in the middle of 63rd Avenue. They called a third officer, Jon Cooke, who ended up writing the police report.”

Then scroll through and read details from the Booking Report.

Booking report from Broward-Palm Beach New Times reporter Rich Abdill via Broward Sheriff’s Office

“When I arrived, I discovered the arrestee laying on the ground behind his vehicle. He was in the fetal position, with his fingers in his mouth. He appeared to be attempting to induce himself to vomit. I noticed vomit on his clothes, as well as inside and next to the driver door of his vehicle. I noticed a strong odor of an alcoholic beverage emanating from his breath and person. His speech was extremely slurred and he was crying. His face was flushed and his eyes were bloodshot.”

He was also charged with driving with a suspended license. It was his first offense on each count.

WMEN-AMThat’s when he ended up at Palm Beach sports radio station WMEN-640 AM.

Rosenberg stayed until becoming co-host of The Bernie and Sid Show on — you guessed it — WABC-AM! That was in January, 2016. In November, he replaced the fired Wolf on Imus.

bernie sid wabc

But last month, Imus announced the show would air its final episode on March 29.

What a crazy business! It has to be, with such crazy people.

 

imus in the morning poster Pinterest

don imus time magazine

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