Beating Welch’s un-kosher coupon policy

coupon-circled

I don’t get shocked too much anymore.

Maybe that’s from age, or having done a lot of things in a lot of places. Maybe it’s from having been in the news and teaching fields, where you see and experience a lot.

But going through the weekly ads this week got me.

I’ve never seen “non-Kosher” as being a requirement on a coupon.

Sure, must buy two, only certain sizes, purchase before the expiration date. But non-Kosher?!

Welch’s, do you realize how you’re coming across?

You know the people who tend to buy products that are kosher and avoid those that aren’t. Obviously, they’re Jewish people. So it looks like you’re targeting Jews.

In other words, you don’t want people who keep kosher — meaning Jews — taking advantage of your lower prices.

Do you blatantly assume the stereotype all Jews are rich and can spend more money? Or are you just discriminating? Excluding? That doesn’t sound very American, especially now, when the country is polarized and everyone seems so touchy.

Of course, I don’t think that, but that is how it appears. No business is perfect.

Not the Center City Philadelphia restaurant that offers latkes (Jewish word for potato pancakes eaten during Hanukkah) with BACON as an appetizer.

latkes

Or the granddaddy of them all, the Hanukkah HAM at Walmart.

ham2                    ham1

As far as I’m concerned, you’re the company that had to be brought kicking and screaming to offer anything kosher.

Yes, you finally teamed up with Manischewitz a few years ago. (But I didn’t see their name on your bottles.)

bottles-front

I just used the search engine at the top of your website’s homepage to find “kosher” and got only three results, all recipes that require kosher salt!

search-kosher-salt

I did a computer search and found this…

blog-page

…but who would know or even consider 1. going to your navigation bar, 2. choosing Community, 3. then Blog, and 4. then hit ctrl-F to find “Passover” or “Manischewitz” (spelling it correctly) but not kosher? (Or just easily click http://www.welchs.com/our-community/the-official-welchs-blog/delicious-recipes-ideas-for-Passover.)

I don’t need to tell you kosher is big business and growing. You don’t need to tell me kosher items cost more. (I look at friends’ faces when I show them the price of kosher meat.)

Yes, there are rabbis and rules, and special rules for grapes.

But from what I’ve noticed, most major American food companies that sell nationally get most of their products certified kosher, except the ones with obvious ingredients that aren’t (like BACON and HAM).

history1

You’re a pretty big and old company, founded not far from a large Jewish community in Philadelphia and based near a large Jewish community in Boston.

bottles-side

Let me tell you: The prices for your juices at stores are the same, kosher or non-kosher. People just have to check the labels carefully.

The major supermarket I went to today sells your 46-ounce bottles for $3.99, but had them on sale for $2.99. Two of your coupons came this week, so I bought two bottles and saved $2 from the sale.receipt

And I used both coupons. They scanned on the store’s register just like any others. So I saved another $2 and paid just $1.99 each! That’s less than half price.

So maybe you did have a little point with your stereotype. Some of us are good shoppers.

But your company needs this lesson: It can and should know better and do better.

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4 thoughts on “Beating Welch’s un-kosher coupon policy

  1. Loved your writing style in this piece! Interesting information as well. It does make one ponder …why…?

    Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S® 4 mini ™, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

    Liked by 1 person

  2. last year welch’s started making a line of kosher grape juice in conjunction with manischewitz, but the rest of their grape juice still isn’t kosher.Teaming up, Welch’s and Manischewitz challenge kosher grape juice monopoly

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    | | | | Teaming up, Welch’s and Manischewitz challenge kosher grape juice monopoly By By Uriel Heilman For decades, America’s kosher grape juice market has been dominated by Kedem, whose sweet libations come in conc… | |

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  3. I first learned about a kosher version of Welch’s grape juice when I was teaching at that private religious school. It was Friday and a parent supplied the grape juice for that week’s Shabbat party. I brought it to the religious administrator’s attention, automatically thinking it wasn’t kosher because of the Welch’s name, and she told me how one Welch’s plant was kosher, and to automatically check the label. Not for Passover, but regular kosher. And no Manischewitz logo on the bottle, which would have caused me to not automatically think it wasn’t kosher. And that was before 2015.

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